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Next To No Time & British Comedies of the 1930s: Vol 2 on DVD in June

22 May 2015

Network Distributing have announced a further two DVD titles in their ongoing 'The British Film' collection, the 1958 comedy Next to No Time and the 2-film collection British Comedies of the 1930s Volume 2.

 

Next to No Time (1958)

David Webb, a brilliant backroom boffin who is cripplingly shy and nervous in unfamiliar situations, has an ingenious scheme for converting his employer’s factory to automation. The project, however, requires more capital than the firm can provide, and to his horror Webb finds himself thrust aboard the liner Queen Elizabeth and heading inexorably to America, where he is expected to track down a famous industrialist and persuade him to finance the scheme.

British cinema legend Kenneth More (Scrooge, Sink the Bismarck!) heads an outstanding comedy cast in this brilliantly engaging adaption of a story by Oscar-nominated screenwriter and novelist Paul Gallico (The Pride Of The Yankees).

Filmed extensively on the Queen Elizabeth – then the largest liner in the world – Next To No Time is released on UK DVD on 1st June 2015 at the RRP of £9.99, courtesy of Network’s ‘The British Film’ collection.

Next To No Time is presented here in a brand-new transfer from original film elements, in its as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio. Special features will include:

  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Image gallery
  • Promotional material PDF

British Comedies of the 1930s Volume 2

The Ebullient comedy films of the 1930s brought escape and laughter to millions of British cinemagoers, enabling veteran stars of music-hall and theatre to reach out to a wider audience.

The two films included in this set are as follows.

Oh, What A Duchess! (1933)
Also known as My Old Duchess, this amusing farce of the music hall variety sees an actor impersonating a duchess, and succeeding in impressing an American so much that he takes him and the rest of his company to Hollywood.

It’s A Bet (1935)
Rollo Briggs, an irresponsible young newspaper reporter, is sacked from his job. He then agrees to a wager with Norman, a wealthy newspaperman, that he will be able to disappear completely for a month. But what he doesn’t know is that Norman is a keen rival for his girl, Anne.

Although comedy would prove to be the decade’s most successful film genre, many of these classic early talkies have remained unseen since their original release. From boisterous knockabout humour to polished adaptations of popular stage farces, this ongoing collection showcases a wealth of rare features, each presented uncut, in a brand-new transfer from the best available elements in their as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio.

British Comedies Of The 1930s Volume 2 featuring Oh, What A Duchess! and It’s A Bet is available on UK DVD from 1st June 2015 at the RRP of £12.99, courtesy of Network’s ‘The British Film’ collection.